PDR: An Introduction and Brief History

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PDR: An Introduction and Brief History

In considering moving into Paintless Dent Repair (or Paintless Dent Removal), we may wish to reflect back to its origins – its history dating back to the 1940’s in Europe. Consider being a specialist technician in those assembly lines massaging dents using the common table spoon to avoid repainting of the ‘whole shelled’ vehicles known as ‘monocoque’. Despite the change in tool technology and obviously gauge of metal from thick to thin, the sense of being alone unique in the workplace still applies in some circumstances.PDR has evolved into a major and organised industry spreading across Europe to the United States, South Africa, Asia and now exploding in Australia. The industry itself is relatively new in Australia perhaps becoming more popular during the Sydney hailstorm but probably around with a few that had the techniques from Europe. The fact of the matter is that it is not a regulated industry and basically is not even officially recognised separately from panel beating by ANZSCO. This Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) recognises Panel Beater (code. 324111) as an official occupation but not Paintless Dent Repair or paintless dent removal for that matter. This will change in time as the industry evolves and becomes increasingly popular. Just remember, you are a part of this evolution or more importantly, the PDR revolution.

This course is designed from experiences from within the industry. The author of this course and website owner, Jimmy Deguara, has been in the industry not as a PDR Technician but as an advisor, forecaster, and a consultant in the PDR industry. This concept of training evolved during this time as there was a realisation that the vehicle repair industry was experiencing a change in direction by the insurance companies to accommodate this technology. Why? A guess it basically comes down to economics. PDR is significantly less expensive, much faster and does not require as much removal of parts. Being such low cost, there is less likely to be written off vehicles as it means repairs are more likely to fall within the vehicle valuation threshold. However, because PDR cannot repair all damage, there is a place for panel beating and that the two will co-exist and benefit each other. It seems the initial nervousness has settled, now is the time to enter the market due simply to demand.

Last modified: Sunday, 22 December 2013, 10:57 PM